Green Detox Smoothie

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One day early May I walked into Neal’s Yard Remedies flagship store in Covent Garden and picked up a detox smoothie recipe printed on a card. I was detoxing at the time so it was a timely find. I stick to the core ingredients listed below but I also experiment depending on mood of the day. I’ve been having this smoothie every single morning for the last 3 months and makes me feel amazing.

 

Green & clean smoothie

by Tipper Lewis, Naturopathic Herbalist at Neal’s Yard Remedies

Ingredients (serves 2)

  • Organic Greens Complex – 2 tsp*
  • Organic Virgin Coconut oil – 1 tsp
  • Chia seeds – 4 tsp A great source of omega 3 and fibre
  • Turmeric powder – 1/2 tsp Supports healthy liver, reduces inflammation
  • Avocado – 1
  • Fresh spinach or Kale – 1 large handful
  • Fresh parsley – 3 sprigs (minus stalks)
  • Cucumber – quarter
  • Lemon juice – generous squeeze
  • Apple juice or water – 400ml
  • Dandelion & Burdock Formula – 4ml (optional) Supports the body’s natural purification process

* Organic Greens Complex is a Neal’s Yard product. I have a couple of other products I use instead to mix it up a bit. These are: Organic Wheat Grass from New Zealand and Hemp Powder. The organic Greens Complex has a lot of spirulina and chlorella which is why I tend to use most days.

A note on liquids:

Apple juice: I don’t like my smoothies too sweet and once experimented with 400ml of apple juice and didn’t like it. I always put 200ml organic apple juice (I buy Organic Chegworth Valley cox apple juice from Borough Market) and 200ml filtered water. My mum who got hooked on it prefers to blend fresh apple with water. I do add the occasional fruit too: a handful of grapes or a few strawberries.

Instead of using the optional Dandelion & Burdock formula which contains alcohol (you can purchase from Neal’s Yard) I use 200ml tea I brewed from the night before. So apple juice and detox tea instead of apple juice and water.

Detox tea herbs & roots

  • Burdock Root
  • Dandelion Root
  • Cleavers
  • Nettle
  • Red Clover
  • Calendula

DetoxTea

Check out also my detox story: https://steller.co/s/5tVn26v9e6e

 

Monmouth coffeeshop Borough market

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An institution for years now, queues are forming before the doors open at 7:30am each morning. One of the many beauties of this coffeeshop is that you can choose your own beans and it costs the same. Many years ago I used to buy a beautiful Indian blend so spoke to one of the assistants and she pointed me to Guatemala Finca Capetillo. Very smooth. This is what I have each morning – its label is a beautiful turquoise colour which can be seen in the last shot (alongside the imprint of my favourite lipstick ‘Rebel’ by Mac).

Light gluten free lunch

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Homemade hummus/avocado dip:

  1. 1 avocado
  2. 1 teaspoon tahini
  3. 1 clove garlic
  4. juice of 1 lemon
  5. 1 pack of fresh/sprouted chickpeas*
  6. salt & pepper
  7. drizzle of organic extra virgin olive oil (preferably Greek)
  8. a bit of water (ideally from an alcaline jug such as BioCERA)

Put everything in a blender. I finally decided to go for the real deal: Vitamix.

*Use 1 tin of chickpeas for a more familiar hummus taste. The rawness of the chickpeas is only recommended for true raw energy lovers.

avocadohummus

The wrap:

I have tried many gluten free wraps and they’re all tasteless except this one. If you live in the UK and you can find this brand I highly recommend it. It was Waitrose and not Wholefoods where I purchased it. Double-checked this morning when I went to buy some more and had to visit both shops:)

Spread dip generously, fill with fresh organic rocket. Drizzle of olive oil, wrap and cut to pieces.

Today I ran out of rocket so added some thinly sliced cucumber and cut it like a sandwich:)

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gluetenfree_hummuscucumber

A few tips on eating especially if you suffer from indigestion:

  • Do a food intolerance test. Most common allergies are wheat and dairy.
  • Chew well – I eat way too fast and end up feeling bloated.
  • Keep your mouth closed:)
  • Don’t drink while you’re eating; ideally an hour before or after.

An unusual Greek Salad

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Some unusual Ingredients:

  1. 1 packet of tomatoes (outside Greece, cherry tomatoes are the way to go)
  2. Half a cucumber
  3. 1 red onion
  4. 1 fillet of freshly caught grilled snapper (again I cheated, bought from local chippy)
  5. 1 avocado
  6. A handful of fresh basil leaves
  7. Half a pack of Bulgarian Sheep Feta (Bulgarian is just as good as Greek feta)
  8. Iliada Greek olive oil
  9. Cracked pepper & himalayan salt
  10. Modena Balscamic vinegar

Being Greek this salad may come as a surprise. I love the traditional Greek salad but I also love avocado and grilled snapper. In summer, I have a tendency to turn everything into a salad so here it is:)

The sizes specified above are for one [hungry] person’s dinner or a light lunch for two.

 

Another raw cacao smoothie

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Ingredients:

  • 1 ripe banana
  • 1 tbp raw cacao powder
  • 1 glass of cold yogurt with live cultures
  • 1 very full tsp of manuka honey (!)
  • 1 tbs of almond meal (ground blanched almonds)

Perfect after yoga practice:)

This time I didn’t add ice. The temperature of the yogurt was sufficient to give it a slight cooling effect.

productsThree key products are used for this smoothie (see brands found in NZ):

  • Almond meal – high source of protein
  • New Zealand Manuka honey – antimicrobial and antibacterial, good for stimulating the immune system, providing nutrients for cell metabolism and rapid tissue repair
  • Raw organic cacao powder – high in antioxidants, iron, magnesium and heirloom

Enjoy:)

Snapper rice wrap

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Ingredients:

  1. Homemade guacamole (see below)
  2. Fresh rocket leaves
  3. 1 fillet of grilled snapper (cheated, bought from local chippy)
  4. 1 rice wrap (sadly only 70% rice flower, rest is wheat)

Guacamole:

  • 1 avocado
  • 3 cloves of smokey garlic
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 3 cherry tomatoes
  • cracked black pepper
  • himalayan salt

This is a quick lunch for when you’re starving and you happen to have an amazing Fish & Chip shop up the road who can grill the fish while you’re checking email:)

Once home all you have to do is prepare the guacamole. I like using smokey garlic because it gives it more flavour and bite. I’m lucky to be able to purchase this garlic from the local Saturday farmer’s market. The fish is also locally sourced and fresh, an advantage of living by the sea.

This is more of a special treat as I’m mostly vegetarian.

For those calorie-conscious, this rice wrap which is an Australian brand is only 68 calories and tastes really good.

 

Raw energy nori wrap

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brekkieNori01My friend Ush creating her own favourite combination

This recipe is inspired by two different recipes using nori sheets: one is featured in the Raw Chef blog which uses a pink beetroot-based sauce and just sprouts as a filling and another recipe featured in the book “The raw food healing bible” by Christine Bailey (p.120) which uses a raw parsnip-based sauce and different raw veggies.

When I have a group of people and create this kind of food I like it to be as interactive and as colourful as possible. In different bowls I display all sorts of things so people have a choice. For example, I offer thinly sliced raw carrots, cucumber and red pepper but also kale leaves, raddishes, a variety of nuts and toasted sesame oil. The two sauces featured in the two recipes are fundamental in making this nori roll delicious and filling:)

A note on assembly: just create it in the spirit of a wrap and not a tight sushi roll.

Pink sauce:

  • 1 cup cashews
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 raw beetroot, peeled
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

White sauce:

  • 1 raw parnship
  • 1 3/4 tbsp pine nuts
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tsp tahini
  • Freshly ground black pepper

I was amazed to read about the health benefits of Nori so I include them in this post:

By Michael Ravensthorpe

Rich in protein – 100 grams of nori contain between 30 and 50 grams of protein, making it one of the plant world’s richest sources of protein and comparable in density to spirulina, chlorella, and soybeans. Protein is needed for building and repairing muscles, building enzymes and antibodies, and cell maintenance and growth.

Lowers cholesterol – According to a study published in the June 2001 edition of the British Journal of Nutrition, when rats that were on an otherwise high-cholesterol diet were fed nori, their LDL cholesterol levels lowered, suggesting that nori plays an important role in stabilizing cholesterol levels. Perhaps this is because nori is surprisingly rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which are well-known for reducing LDL cholesterol. They also help lower blood pressure, therefore making nori excellent for the cardiovascular system.

Dietary fiber – Nori is comprised of approximately 33 percent dietary fiber, making it an effective laxative and a good cure for constipation. Also, since high-fiber foods have the ability to make you feel full for longer, nori is also a good weight loss food (a fact that is reinforced by its low calorie and fat content).

Lowers cancer risk – A study published in the May 2010 edition of the British Journal of Nutrition found that the regular consumption of nori was linked to lowered rates of breast cancer for menopausal and pre-menopausal women. This is unsurprising, since nori is rich in antioxidants such as vitamin C that help neutralize the cancer-causing effects of free radicals.

High in iron – 100 grams of nori contain approximately 88 percent of our recommended daily intake of iron, making it an extremely rich source of this much-needed mineral. Furthermore, a Venezuelan study published in 2007 for the Journal of Nutrition showed that nori, unlike many grains and beans, doesn’t contain phytates, which can drastically lower the absorption rate of iron.

Improves bone health – 100 grams of nori contain 280 milligrams of calcium (28 percent of our RDI) and 300 milligrams of magnesium (85 percent of our RDI). While we all know that calcium is good for the bones and is needed to prevent osteoporosis, lesser-known is that fact that we also need magnesium to help absorb it. Since nori contains sizable quantities of both, it is the perfect bone-builder.

Impressive iodine content – Sea vegetables are the plant world’s premier source of iodine, and nori doesn’t disappoint. 100 grams of it contain approximately six milligrams of this extremely important mineral. Indeed, according to the Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ), one sushi roll wrapped in nori contains 92 micrograms of iodine, which is close to an adult’s RDI of 150 micrograms. Iodine deficiencies are very common in the West and can lead to serious conditions such as goiter and hyperthyroidism.

Aside form the nutrients already mentioned, 100 grams of nori also provide us with vitamin A (288 percent of our RDI), thiamine (60 percent), riboflavin (194 percent), niacin (78 percent), folate (475 percent), as well as impressive levels of phosphorous, potassium, zinc, and vitamins C, E, and K.